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Driving in the Sand Info
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Driving in the Sand Info
Posted By: Salvo Jimmy - (Send PM)
Member Since: 10/19/2008
Location: Salvo NC / Hampton VA
Total Posts: 2725

Date Posted: 9/28/2010 7:53 PM




Over the past few months I've been jotting down some thoughts, opinions, observations, experience, etc I've picked up over the years driving on the sand.

Repeatedly the board gets questions like "will my whatever go ok in the sand" or "does anyone have experience with one of these". Then we are all generally back to square one trying to answer it and most times never cover all aspects because the specifics of how the vehicle is equipped are seldom known.

I think the stuff would be useful but only if the moderators put a sticky on it so it does not get buried in a few days on page 20. That way we can refer a questioner to the thread with a reminder to carefully read their owners manual for details while considering the generic stuff in the thread.

And BTW I have no pride of authorship and will take no offense if someone corrects something, provides an alternative, a differing observation or even tells me I'm full of it. So if it does go up feel free to chim in. The more info the better as I see it.

I just want to see it in one readily accesible place.

So what say ye moderators ?????

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Something else
Posted By: hookedonfishing - (Send PM)
Member Since: 7/1/2008
Location:
Total Posts: 5651

Date Posted: 9/29/2010 4:04 PM




You will never get all here to agree on the proper way to drive in the sand or what to use in the way of an orv. They will agree to lower TP though. I think the main thing is the level of expirence a person has driving in the sand, more than anything. Years ago there were lots of 2x's used. I worked with a friend for years who used nothing but a 2x ford pickup. He carried an extra set of rims with ballon tires when he went down (changed his tires), ones that ran very low pressure(and were almost slick). Also to tell a newbie one thing and then they go and drive to a different ramp and wolla,they are stuck. A lot of the ramps and the beaches at these ramps drive different (from ramp to ramp). Lower the TP on your factory highway tire too much, and you could bust a bead. But wait, there are tires made to lower the chance of busting a bead, off road tires, found on 4X4's as a rule. I have them on my PU. Another example, my son and I have the same 4X4. A ford ranger-ext. cab, except mine is the fx4 with the off road package. He has to run 18lbs., mine does great at 21 or 22 lbs.. The difference is the tires

Posted By: Salvo Jimmy - (Send PM)
Member Since: 10/19/2008
Location: Salvo NC / Hampton VA
Total Posts: 2725

Date Posted: 10/7/2010 11:14 AM




Jimmy,

I like the idea and appreciate that you are willing to go to the trouble to put together a guide for new beach drivers. I think HJP's suggestion of a new forum for posts like this is a good one. If only moderators can move a good post like this to the new forum, you wouldn't have to worry about it getting lost. I imagine there would only be a handful of useful Outer Banks topics that would belong there.

I'll see about getting the new forum created this week and then start looking for the answers to FAQ's that belong there.

Cheers,
Will



OK here goes.

I'll put it in seperates posts covering the following.

1.Lowering tire pressure (airing down)

2. Ground clearance

3. Tire types / sizes

4. Gear you might want to have with you

5. Transmission / drive systems

6. Useful tips / info

That way it will be easy for folks to quote, if desired, to add their thoughts and keep replys to a given subject. I recommend we keep the thread generic and discuss specific makes, year/models, sub-models, options, etc in separate threads, so as not to bury the generic stuff among such detail.

Owners can read this thread, then check their owner's manual for details on their particular vehicle, keeping the generic stuff in mind as it applies to their particular vehicle.

Lowering Tire Pressure (Airing Down)
Posted By: Salvo Jimmy - (Send PM)
Member Since: 10/19/2008
Location: Salvo NC / Hampton VA
Total Posts: 2725

Date Posted: 10/7/2010 11:17 AM




Some folks think airing down (lowering tire pressure) is not really necessary and while that is true for some vehicles, there are reasons why you may want to air down regardless of your thinking on this, even if you have nitrogen in your tires.

A vehicle aired down properly to a nice flat optimum tread footprint rolls more easily mostly over the sand rather than mostly pushing down into and thru the sand with hard tires. Thus less torque is required to move the vehicle and less strain on the engine and drive train.

Additionally hard tires tend to give short way less than a full revolution spins as they push thru the sand. This kicks back a little sand forming a washboard / speedbump affect in the sand. The ride is thus more uncomfortable for you from the spins and very uncomfortable for those following.

Now some don’t want to air down because they worry about tire damage / wear on pavement and many carry portable pumps to air up immediately after coming off the sand or at least as soon as they can get to an air station. This really is not necessary if you are at the optimum flat footprint. I air down upon arrival and sometimes stay that way for weeks, only airing up if say I’m going to go from Salvo to Nags Head area. Over the years and many sets of tires I’ve seen no appreciable difference in tire wear than what I would expect at full street pressure.

Now that said there are things to consider when aired down. More sidewall heat is generated as the sidewalls flex more, but if speed is kept reasonable (even 55 mph or less) for the short distances you would travel around the beach area on pavement, it would not be a problem. Also handling, especially in sharp cornering, is affected as the tire tends to “roll” more to the side of the rim in a turn. But again, reasonable speed and avoiding sharp cornering should give no problems. Gas mileage is slightly affected as it takes a little more effort to move the vehicle.

Now you can air down “too much”. When you go below the optimum flat footprint the center of the tread tends to concave in toward the rim and even in the sand you tend to ride more on the tread edges and the hump of sand in the middle adds to the torque required to move the vehicle. While not as bad as hard tires in the sand, it will tend to result in more “digging” from just the edges and pushing thru the sand. And it will cause excessive tread wear on the tread edges on pavement, plus way more heat in the sidewalls.

In addition sharp turns at very low pressure, as in trying to move over out of ruts, can result in breaking a tire to rim seal. Plus if torque is applied when you start to bog down the low pressure can result in the rim spinning inside the tire if the edges “grab” the sand again breaking a seal. I’ve seen this happen on a couple of occasions, one having two seals broken, thus no help from the spare.

Here is a site that discusses the optimum footprint for sand. It is not a one size fits all so you will have to experiment a little to find what fits your setup. Your vehicle should roll rather easily “over” the sand and not require a lot of extra power (torque). And remember street pressure is not necessarily exactly what is on the door placard. The placard is nominal for a nominal load (usually indicated on the placard). Both street and sand pressures are load dependent (including passengers, gas, etc) and may vary front to back, depending on how you are loaded.

[url]http://www.4x4now.com/sfjun96.htm[/url]



When driving in the sand, slow steady progress is best. If you start to bog down, stop. Back up a few vehicle lengths in your tracks and then go forward again with slow and steady. Try to avoid spinning / gunning it as this will generally dig you in.

Ground Clearance
Posted By: Salvo Jimmy - (Send PM)
Member Since: 10/19/2008
Location: Salvo NC / Hampton VA
Total Posts: 2725

Date Posted: 10/7/2010 11:18 AM




Now the next thing is ground clearance.

No matter what type of vehicle drive system you have and how well you are aired down, if it does not have reasonable ground clearance, you are likely to get stuck. So you need to understand what the real ground clearance is. And don’t necessarily believe the stuff in brochures. My 2004 4Runner says it has 9.1” of clearance but that seems to be to drive train / suspension components. There were several areas where body components were at 7.5”, hanging down and around the drive train components. I thus lifted it to get the body components at or above all drive train areas and then put on a slightly taller (1/2”) sidewall tire ( when the first set wore out) to get a clearance I was more comfortable with. Note: oversize tires can affect handling so I stayed within the recommended 3% or less size increase. And of course the speed / odometer is off 3%.

Again the true test is to look under the vehicle and see what might drag in the sand.

Another thing I get rid of or don’t buy is skid plates. If you stay within the speed limit on the beach and pay attention to what you are doing, there is little out there to hit that will cause damage. The plates are generally a low clearance point and do little but catch and hold sand. Even chassis wash car washes are not going to get it all out and it can be a real source of rust if left there. Getting down and trying to hose off the top of the plates can be a real pain.

Another concept you need to understand re clearance is approach angle (front) and departure angle (rear). These are the angles formed when you place a stick against a tire and push it up to contact the bumper. The more vertical the stick, the better. A low clearance vehicle generally has poor angles and this can result in pushing into or dragging on the sand as you approach or come off steep slopes such as access ramps. Also rod butts sticking out the bottom of rod holders can be a problem. Again it is something to be aware of.

And for folks with a front and/or rear cargo / cooler racks, they really screw up the angles. Better to have the racks mounted as high as possible. See my avatar. Now that said, be careful of having something sticking up more that 13’ 6” off the pavement. That is the min height things like overpasses, wires, etc can be at. Anything above that can be a problem.

And finally keep in mind when you air down, ground clearance is reduced.

Tire Sizes / Types
Posted By: Salvo Jimmy - (Send PM)
Member Since: 10/19/2008
Location: Salvo NC / Hampton VA
Total Posts: 2725

Date Posted: 10/7/2010 11:19 AM




Now comes tire size / types.

Aggressive tread off road tires are not the best. They tend to dig into the sand more. Slicks would be best but of course not practical. So generally all season radials for most vehicles are the best compromise.

I like 265/70 or larger for size. It has a reasonably wide tread and adequate sidewall for airing down. For sure I would avoid the very low profile tires that come on some vehicles. There is just no sidewall height there to air down with.

Also there are tires out there that are designed for use off road aired down. They are less prone to sidewall heat and rim seal break. I’ve looked for some but all I found had a fairly aggressive tread so I stick with what has worked for years with me. Here’s two examples I got from quizzing BF Goodrich.

[url]http://www.bfgoodrichtires.com/tire-selector/name/all-terrain-t-a-ko-tires[/url]

[url]http://www.bfgoodrichtires.com/tire-selector/name/mud-terrain-t-a-km2-tires[/url]


Further info on the above off road tires indicate they might not be less, but more, prone to sidewall heat. Turns out the sidewalls are “beefed up” to prevent damage from things like rock, stumps, etc.

In addition they have some tread just at the lower edge of the sidewall to help with traction in mud, grassy areas, etc.

I don’t think either of these would be better, so these qualities seem to way offset the better rim seal quality.

Another thing to consider is a P vs LT type tire. Generally the LT has a stronger sidewall because they are usually rated for a heavier load than a P in the exact same size. Thus the P is probably better from a sidewall heat problem.

Sometimes there is a question about vehicles with dual rear wheels and how they do in the sand. I have no experience with these and only know what I’ve read on forums about them. Vehicles with this setup are indicated to be much heavier than others and thus seem to sink into the sand more just from the weight, even when aired down. Also there is indication that an added spacer may be needed between the wheels to keep the tire sidewalls from touching when aired down.

That’s what I’ve seen on duals but maybe some with experience can chime in to correct / add to the above.

Gear You Might Want to Have With You
Posted By: Salvo Jimmy - (Send PM)
Member Since: 10/19/2008
Location: Salvo NC / Hampton VA
Total Posts: 2725

Date Posted: 10/7/2010 11:20 AM




Now what might you want to have with you out there. Here is what I carry. Tire pressure gage A full size spare; space savers are not the best in the sand. Two ¾” plywood boards about 20” square to support jacks in the sand. A 2nd jack. Sometimes you need to support the side of the vehicle away from the flat in soft sand or on a slope to keep it from pushing down into the sand. And yes I’ve seen flats. You don’t have to raise the vehicle a lot because you can support the vehicle with the 2 jacks and dig a hole under the flat to get it off and the spare on. A foxhole shovel. Tow strap; all cloth, no metal. If snapped the metal can become a damaging missile. Jumper cables; you never know. I use my floor mats under the wheels if necessary when “temporarily detained” (stuck), but some carry boards or carpet samples for this.

Drive Systems
Posted By: Salvo Jimmy - (Send PM)
Member Since: 10/19/2008
Location: Salvo NC / Hampton VA
Total Posts: 2725

Date Posted: 10/7/2010 11:21 AM




Now some may wonder why so far I have not mentioned drive systems. Well for years rear 2WD was the norm and all of the above are applicable no matter what vehicle you have. It was not until well after WWII that 4WD really came on the scene for beach driving.


So now drive systems.

There are all sorts of systems out there and even within models and submodels there are differences and options. There are year to year changes as well. So a question of will my Honda CRV or my Ford Escape do OK on the beach cannot really be answered without a lot more specifics. Thus I’m going to have to be a bit generic. However, if you read this and then consult you specific owners manual you should be able to figure out what you may or may not want to try.

By far the best system for the sand is one that is 4WD and where the front/rear differentials can be locked and locked together so that all 4 wheels are pulling together with no slip.

Other “smart” systems like AWD or some that are in a 2WD mode and decide when 4WD is needed, that attempt to put power to where it thinks is necessary generally can just result in digging into the sand. By the time they react in sand, it can be too late. Such systems were generally designed for rain / snow slick pavement and not sand. All the jumping around with power can result in damage from excessive heat. Some manuals even caution that they are not recommended for use off road, particularly in sand.

Now that said it does not mean you can’t be successful with one, particularly if it can be somehow locked into at least some sort of 4WD mode. You just need to understand what you are dealing with.

Another area to understand is any vehicle stability or traction control type system your vehicle has. These are common on recent models. They are designed to help you recover from a skid so when wheels start spinning in sand it will try to correct much like the “smart” drive systems, thinking you are skidding. It is best to have the ability to disable such systems when in sand.

Here is an example. My 4Runner when in 4WD HI is basically in an AWD “smart” mode with stability control also activated. I have a switch that will lock all 4 wheels together and turn off the stability control in this 4WD HI mode. That is what I generally use in the sand, with an occasional use of 4WD LO when things get really tuff, eg. deep soft fluffy sand and bogging at optimum air down.

One more thing. A few years ago a friend who was a service manager at a dealer told me that most 4WD problems he saw were with vehicles that had seldom, if ever, been in 4WD. Along comes the snow dusting and folks try to go to 4WD. Won’t go. Generally because the components are not lubed. Most manuals recommend you exercise the 4WD modes of your vehicle for a few miles about once a month to keep them properly lubed.

Now the locked mode can be a problem exercising on pavement if you have to make a turn so pick a place where you can go some distance without much turn. If the wheels are all locked together and you turn there is no slip between the wheels (inside to outside radius) and you can do damage.

In purchasing a vehicle one thing to consider is a trailering package if the vehicle is not so equipped. These typically provide a larger capacity radiator and a transmission oil cooler. Both are good for the beach to keep engine/trans heat down since, like pulling a trailer, more power is needed in the sand and thus more heat is generated.

Other Useful Info
Posted By: Salvo Jimmy - (Send PM)
Member Since: 10/19/2008
Location: Salvo NC / Hampton VA
Total Posts: 2725

Date Posted: 10/7/2010 11:23 AM




Here is a brochure with driving tips from NCBBA

[url]http://ncbbaonline.com/about-us/beach-driving.html[/url]


And this site has info applicable to the National Seashore, with the Beach Driving brochure of particular interest.

[url]http://www.nps.gov/caha/planyourvisit/off-road-vehicle-use.htm[/url]

And at this site NPS posts a weekly beach access report indicating what portions of the National Seashore beach is closed for wildlife protection.

[url]http://www.nps.gov/caha/parknews/newsreleases.htm[/url]

This site has rules specific to the National Seashore about a number of things you need to know regardless of how you get on the beach

[url]http://www.nps.gov/caha/parkmgmt/upload/2009%20CAHA%20Supt%20Compend%20rev3.pdf[/url]



This site has info on Dare County areas outside the National Seashore.

[url]http://www.co.dare.nc.us/depts/PR/BeachDriving.pdf[/url]

This site has info for Currituck County

[url]http://www.currituckchamber.org/beach.htm[/url]




And sort of related. Is NC 12 open ??? This site gives Dare County road conditions so you know whether to bring the porche or jacked pick up.

[url]http://www.darenc.com/public/roads.asp[/url]


Here’s some tips for those with cooler/cargo racks either front or rear.

You cannot legally block any lights day or night like turn signals, stop, etc. If you do you could be ticketed, but worse if in an accident an ambulance chasing lawyer could argue that you were at fault, when normally you would not be, because your lights were blocked.

Also your rear license plate must be visible day and night and lighted at night. Recently NC had a new law go into effect that a license plate holder cannot impair the visibility (eg, the smoky plastic) or cover essential info like expiration, state etc. Seems this new law has also reminded LEOs of the old law as well and I’ve heard of folks ticketed recently for blocked rear plates.

My front rack is designed so as not to have it or anything on it block lights. I have added rear lights, including license plate holder/light to my rear rack. Lights plug into my trailer light connection.

Posted By: robschonk - (Send PM)
Member Since: 2/23/2009
Location: Avon/Norfolk
Total Posts: 5714

Date Posted: 10/11/2010 6:18 PM




Maybe we could post some random thoughts that might get included in the final sticky, such as:

Don't drive in orange sand, its way too soft.

Don't drive over boards laying on the beach, they may have nails sticking up.

If you get stuck and have to dig yourself out, please fill in the hole.

Don't park in the tracks.

Carry a few strips of old carpet. You can put them under the tires to get traction.

If you have a beach bonfire, don't bury it. It will continue to smolder, and someone walking on the beach the next day could step down into the embers.

Don't spin your tires. You'll only dig a hole so deep your frame will be sitting on the sand. If the frame is on the sand, the heat from the catalytic converter could set your car on fire.

Program the number for Cape Point Exxon into your cell phone.

OK, your turn......

Posted By: Gettysburg Lady - (Send PM)
Member Since: 5/4/2005
Location: Gettysburg, Pa
Total Posts: 2245

Date Posted: 10/11/2010 7:27 PM




All of this is simply great information. Always be prepared for "if" you get stuck - never assume that it won't happen. Experienced beach drivers will tell you it CAN happen. We saw a guy dug in to the axels just over the access at 23 on Saturday. Not sure why - the vehicle was 4 wheel drive - but my guess is he didn't do his homework. I might also advise - don't go alone. If you get stuck and need help - you need another body to help. Let common sense ride with you - don't try to impress anyone - and always, always enjoy the beach. Driving on the beach is a priviledge!

Posted By: Salvo Jimmy - (Send PM)
Member Since: 10/19/2008
Location: Salvo NC / Hampton VA
Total Posts: 2725

Date Posted: 10/11/2010 8:09 PM




Maybe we could post some random thoughts that might get included in the final sticky, such as:

Don't drive in orange sand, its way too soft.

Don't drive over boards laying on the beach, they may have nails sticking up.

If you get stuck and have to dig yourself out, please fill in the hole.

Don't park in the tracks.

Carry a few strips of old carpet. You can put them under the tires to get traction.

If you have a beach bonfire, don't bury it. It will continue to smolder, and someone walking on the beach the next day could step down into the embers.

Don't spin your tires. You'll only dig a hole so deep your frame will be sitting on the sand. If the frame is on the sand, the heat from the catalytic converter could set your car on fire.

Program the number for Cape Point Exxon into your cell phone.

OK, your turn......



That's exactly what I would like to see happen. Some of the stuff you mention is so engrained in my thinking that it never dawned on me to mention it.

BTW I have editied the OTHER USEFUL INFO post a couple of times adding stuff to it.

Posted By: go4x4it - (Send PM)
Member Since: 9/25/2010
Location:
Total Posts: 33

Date Posted: 10/16/2010 1:48 PM




Good idea. I just got back from a 1 week stay at Carova(4x4 area) and we have a 2010 jeep wrnagler sport with 33 inch off the road tires(19 inch rims). We did fine on the sand. We did fine at 35 psi drivign on the beach. But going up the and over the dunes into the rental home area was impossible at 35 psi. We dropped down then to 25 psi with no problems. Airing up compressor that kept cracking the hose was a major problem. We bought a new compressor before making the trip. Big mama air hose was not working while we were there. First Shopping center in Corolla on left headed from beach advised us that they were going to put up 2 new air compressers as everyone keeps coming and asking where to find them at. Timbuck2 or twobuck2 has an air hose but costs 1.00. OBX service station has them too. But not very good..Is an issue with airing up after leaving the 4x4 area in Carova..Would be nice to have them available right after you leave the beach..

Posted By: ish - (Send PM)
Member Since: 6/25/2006
Location: Corolla NC
Total Posts: 8834

Date Posted: 10/16/2010 5:24 PM




We did fine at 35 psi drivign on the beach. But going up the and over the dunes into the rental home area was impossible at 35 psi. We dropped down then to 25 psi with no problems. .

Just so you know, you need to drop the pressure before you get on the beach. Running with 35psi creates washboards in the trails that rattle the filling out of the teeth of everyone behind you. In addition it is very hard on your suspension, engine and trans. Lastly, if you have a new JK Jeep, they are very prone to overheating of the trans in sand. You might wanna check to be sure you have the upgraded trans cooler opt to keep you out of trouble on future trips. MY fav jeep on the beach pic:



Speed kills...A "road"
Posted By: FreshFish - (Send PM)
Member Since: 6/3/2009
Location: AQUATOPIA,NC
Total Posts: 3059

Date Posted: 10/18/2010 1:02 PM




Just so you know, you need to drop the pressure before you get on the beach. Running with 35psi creates washboards in the trails that rattle the filling out of the teeth of everyone behind you.
In addition it is very hard on your suspension, engine and trans.

Lastly, if you have a new JK Jeep, they are very prone to overheating of the trans in sand. You might wanna check to be sure you have the upgraded trans cooler opt to keep you out of trouble on future trips.

MY fav jeep on the beach pic:





Hey ish...While not an expert, IM way experienced in driving on unimproved roads (Dirt, Gravel, beach, desert) and in my opinion, the washboard effect is created by the speed of the vehicle traveling the "road" or beach, then enhanced by prevailing winds, adding to the height/valley differences...As an example, next time UR traveling the beachroad (H-12), especally in Kitty Hawk, look (N feel) the ridges in the sand blown on the road by the wind...Even though it's only a few inches thick, it's enuff to rattle UR stink'n Corona off the console:wink:

IMF:fish:

Posted By: Ed from the Village - (Send PM)
Member Since: 7/27/2009
Location: Corolla, NC
Total Posts: 247

Date Posted: 10/18/2010 5:10 PM




Hey ish...While not an expert, IM way experienced in driving on unimproved roads (Dirt, Gravel, beach, desert) and in my opinion, the washboard effect is created by the speed of the vehicle traveling the "road" or beach, then enhanced by prevailing winds, adding to the height/valley differences...As an example, next time UR traveling the beachroad (H-12), especally in Kitty Hawk, look (N feel) the ridges in the sand blown on the road by the wind...Even though it's only a few inches thick, it's enuff to rattle UR stink'n Corona off the console:wink:

IMF:fish:



You may have a fair explanation but its not the right one for a hopped up track. Air Pressure (or too much of it) creates axle hop. Axle Hop creates a situation where the tracks get all torn up. I've lived up here in Corolla my whole life. You get behind a few trucks with too much air in the tires and you see what causes it pretty quick. You might be right with gravel or whatever - but with the beach - Its air pressure.

Posted By: Salvo Jimmy - (Send PM)
Member Since: 10/19/2008
Location: Salvo NC / Hampton VA
Total Posts: 2725

Date Posted: 10/18/2010 5:25 PM




You may have a fair explanation but its not the right one for a hopped up track. Air Pressure (or too much of it) creates axle hop. Axle Hop creates a situation where the tracks get all torn up. I've lived up here in Corolla my whole life. You get behind a few trucks with too much air in the tires and you see what causes it pretty quick. You might be right with gravel or whatever - but with the beach - Its air pressure.



YARE (You're Absolutely Right Ed)

From my post in this thread on airing down

"Additionally hard tires tend to give short way less than a full revolution spins as they push thru the sand. This kicks back a little sand forming a washboard / speedbump affect in the sand. The ride is thus more uncomfortable for you from the spins and very uncomfortable for those following."

Exactly what Ed refers to as axle hop

Posted By: dingo - (Send PM)
Member Since: 10/14/2010
Location:
Total Posts: 5

Date Posted: 10/18/2010 5:48 PM




I have an 08 silverado Z71 (aired down of course) anyone with experience in the sand? actually what do you prefer, HI 4x4 or LOW 4x4 ? I am thinking HI 4x4 in smooth packed tracks(I don't go fast on beach)..... low when moving(creeping) at idle speed or in soft sand. correct? thoughts? 12 days and counting!!!!! WOOHOO!!!!!!!!!!

Posted By: Big EL - (Send PM)
Member Since: 3/17/2006
Location: Chesterfield, Va
Total Posts: 523

Date Posted: 10/18/2010 8:55 PM




4 high works in most situations. Airing down is the key. I had my fronts go out one day at Oregon Inlet. Ever seen that Ramp on a busy weekend?? I aired down to 15lbs and came right out....thats two wheel drive with a camper on. It's all about a fat tire that floats on the sand ><))))*>

Posted By: go4x4it - (Send PM)
Member Since: 9/25/2010
Location:
Total Posts: 33

Date Posted: 10/18/2010 9:16 PM




We have the upgraded trans cooler. We had to help a family out in a regular car(no 4x4) who was drving in the 4x4 area with 30 psi. he got stuck to his frame and kept spinning. We had a tire gauge(he did not) and a shovel. We lowered him to 15 to get him out and dug him out (level the sand) used 2x4 and got him out. But then he gets stuck again next to the water line in high tide. The water was coming up to his rear tires. Was so afraid he was going to sink this time but lucky for him he got out just in time. Don't understand people not airing down, carrying tire gauges, tow straps, shovel and such when they go in a 4x4 area. We were fine with our new jeep in 4x4 high. We did our research and contacting Jeep and the maker of our tires to ensure we were doing the right thing. We did travel home in our jeep with a 1/3 of the beach back to our home..lol

Posted By: Salvo Jimmy - (Send PM)
Member Since: 10/19/2008
Location: Salvo NC / Hampton VA
Total Posts: 2725

Date Posted: 10/18/2010 10:15 PM




We have the upgraded trans cooler.

Good point I left out. I edited the drive train post to include info on radiators and trans oil coolers

additional stuff idea
Posted By: bhaven - (Send PM)
Member Since: 9/7/2008
Location:
Total Posts: 8

Date Posted: 10/22/2010 6:16 PM




Roll of duct tape and some fresh water. I ran over something and it punctured the bottom radiator hose. I left off radiator cap and used water in the cooler.

Posted By: Ilvhtrs - (Send PM)
Member Since: 10/20/2008
Location: Norton Shores, Michigan
Total Posts: 4247

Date Posted: 10/22/2010 10:29 PM




Did ya ever hear of this? I read it on one of these forums.....if you get stuck in the sand, go fill your big white buckets with water and pour the water by your wheels where you are stuck....the water makes the sand hard enough to drive out of......??????????? Sounds strange to me, but would it work??

Posted By: hookedonfishing - (Send PM)
Member Since: 7/1/2008
Location:
Total Posts: 5651

Date Posted: 10/22/2010 11:19 PM




Hey Sj, maybe you should include something about nitro in the tires. I ran into a guy last week who got framed up twice, and swore he would never drive on the beach again. I asked him did he air down. He said NO, I am running nitro in my tires and I don't want to. If you gonna drive the beaches, you have to air down, get rid of the nitro, because you can't air back up with it.

Posted By: Salvo Jimmy - (Send PM)
Member Since: 10/19/2008
Location: Salvo NC / Hampton VA
Total Posts: 2725

Date Posted: 10/23/2010 10:26 AM




Hey Sj, maybe you should include something about nitro in the tires.

I ran into a guy last week who got framed up twice, and swore he would never drive on the beach again. I asked him did he air down. He said NO, I am running nitro in my tires and I don't have to.

If you gonna drive the beaches, you have to air down, get rid of the nitro, because you can't air back up with it.



Edited the air down post

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