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Rust Prevention.... Fluid Film

By: Bill
9/19/2020 6:50 AM

I know a few people here have recommended a product for their beach cars to prevent rust on the undercarriage.

Is that product called FluidFilm?

Also is there anything else?

Having just moved to the beach, I picked up a used Xterra for the beach with only 60,000 miles. While this will not be my daily driver, I want it to last more than a few seasons on the beach. What is the best product to use?

I've driven on the beach for years but I now live at the beach full time so I know I need to do more than the simple wash after a fishing trip

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By: OceanBlue
9/19/2020 9:18 AM

I know a few people here have recommended a product for their beach cars to prevent rust on the undercarriage.


Bill


AKA Wool Wax. That and Salt Away applied first. There are others...the best being (but no longer used) asphalt grease (or what ever one's local vernacular may be for the black gooey never dries stuff we shot in the 50's and 60's.

I like FF as I douse under carriage and engine bay (lightly) and don't have to worry about it gumming stuff up. Hit ih8mud.com and read up on some of the testing and stories - I found another product made by CRC, I think it was....very very good results, but it's a hard finish and I felt it could bugger up some of the stuff (height sensors, etc) in modern 4WDs

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By: Seashell Sandy
9/19/2020 10:39 AM

I was in the Autobody business (repair & sales) for about 16 years, and the product everyone seemed to use here in our area is called POR-15. Yes, it seems expensive up front, but the results when used as directed are fantastic. The company sells all sorts of durable coatings. If you get a chance read about them on their website. At a seminar I attended, the representative had dipped 2 metal pipes in the POR-15 chassis black and challenged each of us to beat the pipes together as hard as we could to see if we could get it to chip off....needless to say it never came off, and we had some strong men in that class.

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By: Bill
9/20/2020 8:39 AM

Thanks all. I will check all this out.

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By: OceanBlue
9/20/2020 9:12 AM

I was in the Autobody business (repair & sales) for about 16 years, and the product everyone seemed to use here in our area is called POR-15. Yes, it seems expensive up front, but the results when used as directed are fantastic. The company sells all sorts of durable coatings. If you get a chance read about them on their website. At a seminar I attended, the representative had dipped 2 metal pipes in the POR-15 chassis black and challenged each of us to beat the pipes together as hard as we could to see if we could get it to chip off....needless to say it never came off, and we had some strong men in that class.

Seashell Sandy


It IS amazing stuff, used it on several restos for the undercoating (zinc chromate base then Por15 then black imron ) . But, these were "naked" stripped car bodies - no suspension, braking systems, exhaust, electrical yet installed. Por15 IS amazing stuff - turns rust into, as you say, a hard epoxy like material. The challenge w using Por15 as an undercoating on an operating road going car is that you have all that modern car "stuff" that you cannot shoot Por15 on. Also, Por15 (unless things have changed) cannot be your "top coat" - it must be oversprayed w some kind of finish (imron, was my preference). I cannot imaging the resulting schit show were Por15 shot directly on, say, a vehicle's "corner" with the tire pulled...w FF you literally "douse" it, front, back, top, bottom...bolt the tire/rim back on and you're good to go.

Some additional detail Click to follow link...

EDIT: Just noticed you are Harrisonburg smiley I bet we may know some of the same "car" folks (White Post, for one!)




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By: PaulOinMA
9/22/2020 7:02 AM

English cars used to use Waxoyl. Products still available.

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By: Laszlo
9/22/2020 8:30 AM

I know a few people here have recommended a product for their beach cars to prevent rust on the undercarriage.

Is that product called FluidFilm?

Also is there anything else?

Having just moved to the beach, I picked up a used Xterra for the beach with only 60,000 miles. While this will not be my daily driver, I want it to last more than a few seasons on the beach. What is the best product to use?

I've driven on the beach for years but I now live at the beach full time so I know I need to do more than the simple wash after a fishing trip

Bill


I've been using Fluid Film for years, its great stuff. My neighbor works for the township and they have been using it on all their equipment, police cars, snow removing trucks for 40 years. My last three cars did not have a spot of rust on the underbody after 7 years. I've used it on boat trailers, snowblowers etc.... 5 years ago my buddy had three new AC units installed at his beach home in NJ. After the installation of the condenser units he sprayed them down with Fluid Film and has done so every two years. His neighbor bough 2 units a few weeks after he did and he did nothing to them. His rusted away in about 4 years, my buddies look like New! My 2008 Saab has zero rust on the frame or any other underside body panel. You can buy Fluid Film in spray cans to 5 gallons containers. Its pretty simple to spray on. I do my cars and equipment once every 2-3 years.

FYI......FLUID FILM is not formulated to remove rust. However, if applied over existing rust, it will stop it immediately from spreading further. FLUID FILM will penetrate rust and rust scale to the base metal, loosening and easing in the removal process.

Click to follow link...



When the U.S. Navy needed to conquer the costs and delays of battling rust and corrosion in the ballast tanks of its thousands of combat and support vessels in World War II, an innovative West Coast chemist formulated a powerful weapon based on an unlikely ingredient: lanolin (wool wax).

The savings were immediate. The costs of chipping, sealing and painting were greatly reduced. The new film penetrated corrosion and rust quickly. Application was simple. Protective action was long lasting and economical.

The weapon was FLUID FILM®, produced in a variety of easy-use forms by Eureka Chemical Company. Operating since the early 1940’s and incorporated in 1953, the company continues as a family-owned business managed by descendants of the founding chemist.

From its first seagoing use in the 1940s, FLUID FILM® has been proved in some of the most severe conditions; Industrial, agricultural, raw-terrain construction – even on the space shuttle. Modified over time to adapt to environmental and application considerations, it’s non-toxic/non-hazardous.. FLUID FILM® continues to serve as the most effective corrosion control for industry, farming, industrial and transportation.

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By: Bill
9/22/2020 8:54 AM

Had no thought about use on Air Conditioners and such.

Thanks Laszlo

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By: Laszlo
9/22/2020 9:04 AM

Had no thought about use on Air Conditioners and such.

Thanks Laszlo

Bill


Your welcome, yea you can basically put it on anything metal. The pool service guy came by on our check in day last week while we were unpacking and told me the pool heater wasn't working but would be fixed tomorrow. We got to talking about things and he showed me the unit. It was only two years old, I couldn't believe how the metal had already powered up from the salt and the unit had so much rust on it. I asked him why doesn't everyone at the beach spray anything metal down with Fluid Film? He asked me what it was and I told him. He stopped back on Thursday to thank me, he just bought a six cans and was going to town spraying everything he owned Lol

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